Research

Smart Homes, IoT, and Pervasive Spaces

Inaudible ‘Shadow’ Sounds. Researchers at the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois have designed a sound that is completely inaudible to humans (40 kHz or above) yet is audible to any microphone. The sound creates what researchers call a “shadow,” which is a sound that the microphones can detect. It could allow secure communications, prevent unauthorized recordings, reduce growing load on Bluetooth, and more.

More information: http://synrg.csl.illinois.edu/papers/backdoor_mobisys17.pdf


Robo-cars and Hovering Drones. About the size of a child’s electric toy car, the robo-car comes from the Singaporean startup Otsaw Digital is able to patrol different areas of the city to boost security and hunt for unusual activity.  The car comes with an array of cameras,  laser scanners, inertial measurement unit and ultrasonic sensors, GPS, and long range data transmitters., that allow for granular data collection.

More information: https://goo.gl/kotscY


Near-zero power Temperature Sensor. Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a temperature sensor that runs on only 113 picowatts of power—628 times lower power than the state of the art and about 10 billion times smaller than a watt. This “near-zero-power” temperature sensor could extend the battery life of wearable or implantable devices that monitor body temperature, smart home monitoring systems, IoT devices and more.

More information: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-04705-6.pdf


Synthetic Sensors. A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have created an all-in-one sensor which may change the way smart homes are connected in the future. Known as the “Synthetic Sensor,” the prototype can monitor activities in areas of your home and removes the need for consumers to add after-market sensors to products for individual devices to be connected to a network.

More information: http://www.gierad.com/assets/supersensor/supersensor.pdf